How to find your books

rodcorp: Books by colour, blurredrodcorp: Books by colour, blurred

30 Oct 2020

Matt Webb wrote about using an app called Memos to make his bookshelves searchable: find where that book is by searching your photos. Brilliant, though I guess it needs your bookshelves and the photos to stay fairly in sync.

My own book filing scheme used to be by colour, which worked very well when I had plenty of time to look at books, and remember what colour they were. But for a few years recently I’ve filed books by random stow, which I do not recommend because it’s not very useful.

Amazon should make a smart camerathing that looks at your shelves, tells you what is where, but also notes that you haven’t moved these books at all in 24 months and they’re worth X on the second hand market click here to make it happen.

2024: Amazon Prime Home team lead Karyn steps around a Freshco grocery delivery drone twitching on the path. It has been jammed by your home’s router for a breach of delivery licence, and will be released shortly. Your Amazon door authenticates Karyn, and she walks into your home. She sets the Dash scanner going in the living area. While it’s looking at your belongings, she disconnects your TV and pops back out to the truck to get a newer one. She reconnects your PrimeFire box to the new screen but puts the Google Chromecast TV dongle to one side, placing a helpful advice sticker on it. The Dash scanner meeps and identifies with a laser light a dozen items in the room that are on your Unwish list. She places these in a cardboard box, and once they’re sold in Amazon’s Seim Anew market your Prime account will be updated with a credit.


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